July 2017

This is a text only version of the newsletter. To view the newsletter online, click here.

This month's edition of the Heritage & Education Centre's (HEC) monthly newsletter includes new items on Project Undaunted, a new website survey and a fascinating guest blog!

Sarah Clifford Smith guest blog

Over the past few months, Curator of Maritime History & Heritage, Barbara Jones, has been working closely with Sarah Clifford Smith, a university student studying model making.

As part of her university degree, Sarah was asked to find and work with a client in producing a model.  Using longitudinal and mid-ship section plans from the Centre's archive, Sarah chose to build a ship model of the welled fishing smack, Robert Miller (1872).

You can read Sarah's fascinating blog here. HEC would like to extend its thanks to Sarah for her excellent model and the care and attention to detail she provided.

Undaunted update

The Centre's digitisation team are continuing the gargantuan task of cataloguing over 120,000 documents! 

This month, the team surpassed 23,000 items catalogued, and even made time to catalogue documents for the Conte Rosso. Eloisa shared a vibrant boiler plan of the Italian liner on Twitter.

As always, you can follow the team's progress by searching #ProjectUndaunted.

London International Youth Science Forum

On Friday 28 July, the Centre hosted students from the London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF). The Forum, founded in 1959, aims to promote a greater understanding in scientific fields for students worldwide.

The students were given presentations on the safety and educational activities of Lloyd's Register Group (LR) and the Lloyd's Register Foundation (LRF) Topics discussed included LR's classification services and the LRF-funded International Water Security Network.

Interesting enquiries

HEC's Information Advisor, Anne Cowne receives historical ship enquiries from the public every day.

This month, Anne provided a comprehensive history of the yacht White Cloud for an enquirer. Anne gave a list of owners for the yacht, dating from 1914 to 1977, as well as her Official Number, shipbuilder and port of registry.

The Centre offers its historical research service to the public free of charge, furthering education and interest in maritime history.

Website Survey

The Heritage & Education Centre is committed to ensuring that students, scholars and the general public have the best experience in using our resources.

Consequently, we are looking at improving our website content and design. To ensure that web user's suggestions are heard, a new website survey has been added to the LRF website.

If you would like to fill out our short survey, please click here.

Open House London 2017

Open House is less than a month away!

The event will see the General Committee room, Old Library, Main Reception, Old Lobby and First Floor Landing open to the general public for one day only. Visitors will also get a chance to see the Centre's library, archived materials and treasures!

71 Fenchurch Street has also been featured in London International Shipping Week's event calendar and the Visit London website's Open House webpage.

For everything you need to know about the event, including opening times, visit our Open House London webpage.

These are a few of our favourite things...

The HEC team use the historic library and archive at Fenchurch Street every day. But what are their favourite treasures? This month's edition features Archives & Collections Assistant, Wayne Fortune.

Having recently joined the LRF Heritage & Education Centre team one of the most enjoyable distractions to my day-to-day activities is noting the vast array of incredible objects stationed around 71 Fenchurch Street. My favourite item - or rather items - are the pair of speckled grey marble lions guarding the entrance hall.

These sculptures were a gift from Francisco Schiaffino, the first Lloyd’s Register surveyor to be appointed at Genoa in 1872, and are 19th century versions of a group of twelve bronze lions sculpted by Matteo Bonicelli in 1651, themselves based on the famous Medici Lions. 

To read Wayne's extended post, visit his blog on the HEC website.

Did you know?

Register Book subscribers could pay for their Register to be “posted” to keep it up to date. From 1880, for subscribers in London, the Registers were collected by the Society’s messengers in a hired horse drawn van. Eventually LR acquired its own horse and van and this practice continued until 1947, when the last horse Paddy retired. Paddy won a number of competitions in Hyde Park for the smartest turned out horse and van.

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